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Concentration in

Printmaking

The Printmaking program focuses on investigation in both practice and theory. Priority is given to both critical thinking and skill development as students pursue excellence and attain a high level of craftsmanship.

Throughout printmaking courses, students will learn the relief and intaglio processes by producing zinc plate intaglio prints with hard-ground, soft-ground, aquatint, and other techniques. Students will also produce woodcut prints producing multi-block multicolor prints focusing on the goal of consistency within an edition. Students are also introduced to a variety of other techniques such as monotype, monoprint, collograph, and some photo processes.

Studio Equipment and Facilities

  • Studio Space
    • 1550 sq ft. Open studio space 
    • 156 sq ft Ventilated Acid Room with sink
    • 64 sq ft Darkroom with sink
  • Presses
    • 1 – Sturgis Etching Press (28” x 48” Pressbed)
    • 1 – Griffin Etching Press (26” x 46” Pressbed)
    • 1 – Griffin Lithography Press
  • 2- 23” x 40” Stainless steel acid baths (Nitric)
  • Large 3’ x 6’ washing basin (2 additional sinks in open studio)
  • 1 Bench Grinder
  • 2 Hotplates (2’ x 3’)
  • Paper cutter
  • Metal Plate cutter
  • 2 Large multilevel drying racks (78 levels in total)
  • Multiple paper soaking trays (3’ x 4’)
  • Aquatint Box with compressed air
  • Ink mixing table (31/2 ’ x 7’)
  • 16 Litho-stones
  • Individual students shelves and lockers
Prints.jpg

Curriculum

Integrated into the course content are various readings that introduce students to the history of aesthetics and contemporary theory. Students are encouraged to relate these concepts to their work as a way to develop both knowledge of the history of aesthetic theory but more importantly to develop their own informed ideas within our contemporary context. Students will see themselves within the ongoing development of art’s history and so choose their direction within that context. As such advanced students are encouraged to develop a cohesive body of work within a variety of techniques both traditional as well as experimental.